Affect within Design Practice and Process

By Akari Kidd and Jan Smitheram.

Published by The International Journal of Architectonic, Spatial, and Environmental Design

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: August 22, 2014 $US5.00

“Affect” has provided scholars with a variety of ways for conceptualizing the pre-conscious and pre-verbal processes that occur between both human and non-human bodies. This paper explores the practice of architecture through the lens of affect by considering how design practices involve particular contingencies in relation to a building’s design process. Specifically, the paper asks: how do the negative affects of restlessness arouse interest and positively impact the evaluative processes of design? This question is explored through an examination of the design, production, and assembly of the cardboard paper tubes that were recently designed by Shigeru Ban Architects for their Christchurch Transitional Cardboard Cathedral. We will argue that the design actions are not independent, but embody different affects, particularly those of restlessness. We will also define how these affects of restlessness transmit and attach to the tubes and intensify their “stickiness,” creating further interest and positively impacting the design process. Finally, we recognize the usefulness of sticky affects to highlight problems in the design process.

Keywords: Affect, Practice, Design

International Journal of Architectonic, Spatial, and Environmental Design, Volume 8, Issue 1, October 2014, pp.33-42. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: August 22, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 311.387KB)).

Akari Kidd

Ph.D Candidate, School of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture and Design, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand

Dr. Jan Smitheram

Senior Lecturer, School of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture and Design, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand