Re-training Perception: A Case Study in Oklahoma, United States

By Rukmini Ravikumar and Amy Johnson.

Published by Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal โ€” Annual Review

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published Online: July 31, 2015 $US5.00

This paper presents a project developed by the authors to help students transcend mind-blocks caused by negative stereotypes associated with the state where their university is located. The hypothesis made is that the location of an educational institution could limit or impede students' perceptions of self-worth as emerging designers. The authors investigate the correlations between placement rates, confidence rates of new graduates, and sustenance as graphic designers in the local market of Oklahoma City to the stereotypes of Oklahoma caused by its history, location, and contemporary events in the specific case of a mid-sized state university with a four year BFA in Graphic Design. The authors aim to make a case for curriculum that can engage students from anywhere in the world, irrespective of their proximity to a design hub, to develop a body of work that is competitive in the global economy.

Keywords: Stereotype, Curriculum, Oklahoma

Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal โ€” Annual Review, Volume 8, 2014, pp.81-88. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published Online: July 31, 2015 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.422MB)).

Rukmini Ravikumar

Assistant Dean, Chair, Department of Design, College of Fine Arts and Design, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, Oklahoma, USA

Amy Johnson

Chair, Department of Design, College of Fine Arts and Design, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK, USA